NHPS: “One Nation, One Scheme is Enticing”, But Will It Work?

Yet another slogan: “One nation – One Universal Health Coverage (UHC)” would indeed be enticing for many, including India.

Nevertheless, that’s just a hope. Let’s now try to get a message out of what has been recently happening around this area through some reality checks.   The reality is, during post union budget (2018-19) television discussions on the ‘National Health Protection Scheme NHPS’, various experts very enthusiastically created a general impression that the scheme is a game changer for India. Many of us also felt that India is moving fast towards a viable UHC in the country!

As a consequence of which, it was widely expected that State Governments, too, will make necessary provision in their respective health budgets towards this ambitious insurance-based healthcare project. This specific step is absolutely essential, as the State Governments are supposed to contribute 40 percent towards NHPS.

Is it happening that way?

Intriguingly, on March 9, 2018, when Maharashtra State budget was announced, one witnessed a different reality altogether on the ground. In its 2018-19 budget, the Maharashtra Government, reportedly, ‘slashed its budget allocation for the health insurance scheme for the poor by over 50 percent.’

The Finance Minister of Maharashtra announced an allocation of ₹576 crore for the ‘Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Jan Aarogya Abhiyan’ in 2018-19 as against the last year’s budget outlay of ₹1,316 crore for the same area.

Keeping this latest development just as an example, in this article I shall explore some of the recent developments on the much talked about NHPS. Before doing that, let me give a perspective on the NHPS.

NHPS: not a new promise:

Rekindling the perennial hope on UHC in India, ‘National Health Protection Scheme NHPS’ was first announced by the incumbent Government in its 2016 budget, but the scheme didn’t take off. In its first avatar NHPS offered ₹100,000 insurance cover, with a top-up of ₹30,000 for senior citizens.

“It couldn’t get implemented, but that scheme is now subsumed by this current scheme,” reportedly, justified Manoj Jhalani, Additional Secretary in the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, who has been given additional charge and designated as Mission Director of Ayushman Bharat, currently.

There isn’t any doubt that NHPS has been recast in the Union Budget Proposal of 2018-19, with a slight modification in naming it to ‘Ayushman Bharat—the National Health Protection Scheme (AB-NHPS)’. The modified scheme is also termed by many as “Modicare”, probably following ‘Obamacare’ in the United States. The Union Finance Minister of India in his Budget speech also termed this scheme as ‘the world’s largest government funded healthcare program.’

A recast of insurance-based public health coverage:

As a part of ‘Ayushman Bharat Program’, the scheme will now provide health insurance cover of up to ₹500,000 to 100 million poor and vulnerable families. Its benefits are now expected to reach 500 million individuals – 40 percent of India’s population, raising health insurance cover by up to 17 times from the existing Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY) that pegs the health coverage at ₹30,000 per year.

Just to give a flavor of the past, the National Family Health Survey-4 (2015-16) indicates that in India only 28.7 percent families have, at least, one person covered by a health insurance policy.

In the health insurance coverage based NHPS, the center and states will split financing the scheme in a 60:40 ratio. However, it is still not clear how would they do it. Neither is it known how the NHPS will fit in with the existing RSBY or various already existing state level schemes.

Apprehension expressed by some States:

Several other Indian States, such as Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Karnataka, West Bengal and Rajasthan already have a similar health protection scheme in place. Probably because of this reason some of these states, such as West Bengal and Karnataka, reportedly, have raised doubts about whether they will actually join the scheme.

On the other hand, health officials from  Telangana, Tamil Nadu and Kerala intend to seek clarifications from the Centre on various aspects of the plans. As I mentioned before, this is mostly because all States will require to contribute 40 percent of total expenses towards funding the ‘Ayushman Bharat—the National Health Protection Scheme (AB-NHPS).’

A fresh evaluation: Experts don’t rate public health insurance schemes high:

Interestingly, some fresh apprehensions on the effectiveness of insurance-based health coverage continues to come up. One such is as follows:

“The current approach of National Health Mission – whereby states must pre-commit to expenditure allocations across 2,000 budget lines with no real flexibility to subsequently move expenditures between different line items – will render NHPS ineffective.”

This apprehension has been raised by none other than Dr. Arvind Panagariya, currently Professor of Economics at Columbia University and the Vice Chairman of the Government of India’s think-tank NITI Aayog, between January 2015 and August 2017. This article, titled “It’s all in the design: Ayushman Bharat can be transformational if the governance of public healthcare is altered”, was published in the Times of India on March 07, 2018.

Dr. Panagariya further observed: “For the poorest of the poor to seek private hospital care speaks volumes for their lack of confidence in the public healthcare system. Studies by experts do not give high marks to existing insurance schemes either.”

Some key observations:

In his above recent article, Dr. Arvind Panagariya made some key observations that include some of the following:

  • A 2017 study of the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY), published in the journal Social Science and Medicine, concludes, “Overall, the results [of our study] suggest that RSBY has been ineffective in reducing the burden of out-of-pocket spending on poor households.”
  • In 2014-15, private hospitals treated 58 percent of in-patient cases in rural areas. Even among the poorest 20 percent rural households, 42.5 percent of the patients went to private hospitals for in-patient treatment.
  • Resource shortage has resulted in less than adequate infrastructure and personnel in the public health facilities. Consequently, in 2014-15, a mere 28 percent of those needing outpatient care came to the public health facilities. A hefty 72 percent of patients went to private providers.
  • Considering that the private providers are predominantly unqualified individuals, often having no more than a high school education and no formal medical education, such disproportionate reliance on them is indicative of a serious failure at the public health facilities, especially in rural India.
  • Design and implementation challenges facing NHPS are even greater. Hospitals will have an inherent interest in pushing patients towards more expensive procedures or towards procedures not even required. Any lack of clarity in delineating the included and excluded procedures will become a source of abuse.
  • Superior outcomes would require a fundamental change in governance whereby performers are rewarded, and non-performers are punished. The story on secondary and tertiary care is not especially different.

In my view, these observations are worth taking note of, urgently, and more importantly, by learning from the past, avoiding similar mistakes getting repeated. Meaningful implementation of NHPS on the ground should be a top priority, especially when around 7 percent of the country’s population gets pushed below the poverty line, every year, due to high out of pocket health expenditure.

I also discussed the subject in this Blog on February 05, 2018. The article was titled “Union Budget 2018: The ‘WOW’ Moment for Indian Healthcare?


Any meaningful initiative on public healthcare for all, will be wholeheartedly welcomed in India, just as many other announcements made earlier by various Governments over a period of time. AB-NHPS – although announced in the very last year of the incumbents Government’s first 5-year term, has attracted similar interest. No less enthusiasm was displayed by the stakeholders, when the NHPS was first announced in the 2016 Union Budget of India.

The good news is, in the midst of all this, on March 06, 2018, Prime Minister Narendra Modi has, reportedly, reviewed the preparedness for the launch of AB-NHPS.’ However, details of the same are not known to many, just yet.

That said, any type of insurance-based public health coverage, spanning across the length and the breadth of India, without access to well-equipped and well-staffed health facilities, currently poses a serious handicap for the nation. It may be a legacy factor, but nothing significant happened in the last four years, either. This is regardless of around 70 percent of the country’s population still live in rural India, with a sizeable majority denied of access to affordable health care, as up till now.

Let me come back to the basic question: ‘One Nation, One Scheme, though, is enticing, but will it work?’ I reckon, unlike, 2016, if NHPS is effectively implemented urgently, together with ‘Ayushman Bharat’ program in its entirety, as desired, things could possibly change for the better, in a medium to long term time frame.

However, it appears, a workable game plan of AB-NHPS is still unclear to many, including a large number of State Governments who are supposed to be the key implementers of NHPS. In this scenario, would AB-NHPS fetch any palpable near-term dividend to the target citizens, at least in 2018 or even in 2019?

By: Tapan J. Ray 

Disclaimer: The views/opinions expressed in this article are entirely my own, written in my individual and personal capacity. I do not represent any other person or organization for this opinion.


Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.