What A New Microbe Can Man Can’t?

Our world is indeed so fascinating, where mankind is in possession of a predictable lethal power to annihilate fellow citizens of any country or countries – just in minutes or hours or days, as it would decide. Whereas, any sudden attack of an unpredictable crippling power of unknown microbes, can make the same mankind feel helpless – grappling to save lives of the citizens – along with its socioeconomic fabric.

Because of the sudden nature of such crippling attacks, mankind is put to fight against time to build a new arsenal of medicines and vaccines – while defending itself under an umbrella of preventive measures. It’s not that such a situation was never envisaged. On the contrary, as we shall see below, the warning from the same came from several credible sources. Even Bill Gates during a TED Talk five years ago had warned: “If anything kills over 10 million people in the next few decades, it’s most likely to be a highly infectious virus rather than a war – not missiles, but microbes.”

A few years later, the 2018 publication of the World Health Organization (WHO) – ‘Managing epidemics,’ articulated a similar cautionary note, which I am quoting in verbatim: “We are continuously learning about the unpredictable powers of nature. This is nowhere more true than in the continuous evolution of new infectious threats to human health that emerge – often without warning – from the natural environment.” Elaborating the point, it further cautioned: “Given the effects of globalization, the intense mobility of human populations, and the relentless urbanization, it is likely that the next emerging virus will also spread fast and far. It is impossible to predict the nature of this virus or its source, or where it will start spreading.”

Ironically, in about a year’s time, by end 2019, a new Coronavirus broke out in Wuhan of China. From January to March 22, 2020, 13,569 people, reportedly, died globally due to Coronavirus (Covid 19) infection. In India, as I write as I write during 14 hours long public curfew, 341 confirmed cases and 6 deaths have been reported. This outbreak has now shaken, almost the entire world – more than even before. The reverberation of the life-shattering impact of the disease, is now being felt and heard across all the facets of human life, including social, economic and political. Thus, the broad point to ponder in this article: Why the mankind can’t do what a new microbe can?

Various elements to it:

There are various elements of the above broad issue. A comprehensive response to which would involve, at least, two critical sub-questions:

  • Was it avoidable? If so, to what extent?
  • Or, at least, could its overall impact have been blunted?

Moving in that direction, let me try to explore some important facts that may help taking an unknown microbe bull by the horn, if such calamity strikes again – unannounced, in future.

None of these facts were unknown:

As we have seen above, the possibility of emergence and a sudden crippling strike of a new microbe was not unknown, including the warning of a global crisis from the W.H.O.  Besides, ‘nearly 50,000 men, women and children are dying every day from infectious diseases; many of these diseases could be prevented or cured for as little as a single dollar per head.’

Another interesting report: ‘Global rise in human infectious disease outbreaks,’ published in the Journal of the Royal Society interface on December 06, 2014, presents more facts. It says: Since 1980, over the last 30 years till 2014, outbreaks of infectious disease mostly caused by bacteria and viruses are steadily increasing with different health impact in different countries.

Several reasons for the high death rate related to infectious disease:

Several reasons could be attributed to high death rates for infectious disease, despite the availability of a large number of powerful antibiotics in the world, which include the following:

  • Developing nations with lesser access to drugs.
  • Fast development of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) owing to misuse and abuse of antibiotics.
  • Emergence of new bacteria and viruses, such as, Covid19 catching the population off-guard, as is being warned by top experts, from time to time.

Several times in the past, I wrote on the subjects of access to medicineAntimicrobial Resistance (AMR), as well as the recent Coronavirus outbreak. Nevertheless, for this specific discussion, I shall focus only on the second and the third points, in the reverse order, with a different perspective.

Fresh threats of new infections are ongoing:

As the 2018 paper of ‘Managing epidemics’, published by the World Health Organization (WHO) had articulated – besides new microbial pandemics, the history of previous viral outbreaks can also possibly repeat themselves. That means: ‘A new HIV, a new Ebola, a new plague, a new influenza pandemic are not mere probabilities. Whether transmitted by mosquitoes, other insects, contact with animals or person-to-person, the only major uncertainty is when they, or something equally lethal, will arrive.’

As these being ‘newer’ types – just as Covid19 is so different from commonly occurring Flu - in all probability would be unique viruses with unique characteristics. For example, as the W.H.O describes, while Seasonal Flu cannot be stopped, countries still have the chance to limit cases of Covid19, through stringent implementation of scientific protocols. More, importantly, Covid-19 seems to lead to much more severe disease than Seasonal Flu strains.

Effective solution of both – the new and the new forms of known viruses, would require successfully navigating through tough challenges, involving multiple areas, such as, medical, technological, social, economic and political. No doubt, the world has progressed a lot in this area. But, effective ‘capacity building’ to combat the sudden onslaught of any deadly microbial pandemic, still remains an unfinished agenda.

The world has moved a lot, but still needs to accelerate capacity building:

Just in 2018, the world remembered the devastating Great Flu pandemic of 1918 on its 100th anniversary. Although, it lasted only a few months, claimed 50 million to 100 million lives worldwide. The book - ‘Influenza: The Hundred Year Hunt to Cure the Deadliest Disease in History,’ provided a glimpse of that scenario. Interestingly, Flu still kills about 1 percent of those infected by this virus. Whereas, about 3.4 percent of Covid-19 cases have been fatal, as on date, according to the W.H.O.

A comparison of these two pandemics will include both the similarities and the differences. The most striking similarity being – in both the global pandemics, most people are just not afraid, but are also getting panicked.

Whereas, the key differences between the two episodes are – the quality health care infrastructure in today’s globalized world, speed of diagnosis and the versatility of available drugs – even for ‘repurposing’, as being done in the present situation. Now, many people understand the need of putting the exposed persons in isolation – or under quarantine, besides co-operating with various infection control measures, as prescribed by the health authorities. In the midst of this crisis, an ongoing and very related critical issue remains virtually ignored - fast developing AMR, as I mentioned above.

Fast developing AMR continues taking many lives:

In this article, instead of dwelling on the cause of AMR and how to address it, I would rather focus on the current threats that AMR poses and will pose in the future, if not addressed on a war footing, collectively.

The latest details in this area are available from the paper – ‘The Antimicrobial Resistance Benchmark 2020’, published by the Access to Medicine Foundation. It emphasized that infectious diseases are still the cause of “more than 500,000 deaths each year, including more than 200,000 infant deaths. In India, for example, resistance exceeds 70 percent for many widespread bacteria.” As I mentioned in one of my previous articles that the 2017 Review Article, titled ‘Antimicrobial resistance: the next BIG pandemic,’ has termed India as ‘the AMR capital of the world.’ Even a 2020 news report says: Two million deaths are projected to occur in India due to AMR by the year 2050.

The current status:

The following two reports of WHO, published in January 2020, unfolded some interesting facts:

The analysis demonstrated, although, many drug companies are making enough investments to discover and develop innovative medicines, anti-infective therapy area does not feature there for most companies. As the reports unraveled:

  • Not just a declining trend of investment, even the current clinical pipeline remains insufficient to tackle the challenge of AMR.
  • With large drug companies continuing to exit the field, primarily due to commercial considerations, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are entering this space, but not with as much resources and other wherewithal.
  • All the eight new antibacterial agents, approved since July 01, 2017, offer limited clinical benefits.
  • One new anti-TB agent, pretomanid, developed by a not-for-profit organization, has been approved for use within a set drug-combination treatment for MDR TB.
  • The current clinical pipeline contains 50 antibiotics and combinations and 10 biologicals. Six of these agents fulfil at least one of the innovation criteria; only two of these are active against the critical MDR Gram-negative bacteria, with a major gap in activity against metallo-β- lactamase (MBL) producers.

As the AMR situation is getting worse, globally, unlike any possible repetition of a new microbial attack in the future, AMR isn’t a future problem. It needs to be addressed here and now. Fixing the problem does not require a scientific miracle. It demands a very human solution, spearheaded by the R&D based drug companies, the academia and the Governments, collectively. The reasons of why it is not happening - is known to many, but how to chart an effective pathway for its meaningful resolution – possibly isn’t. The signal today is loud and clear that infectious diseases are reemerging and threatening human lives – be it due to AMR or a sudden attack by a new microbe such as Covid19.

Conclusion:

It is loud and clear that infectious diseases will continue to reemerge in various shapes, forms and virulence – having the incredible power of shaking the world, including the most powerful and developed nations, as we all are experiencing today. As and when Covid19 pandemic gets over, and it will, learning from the past situation and picking up the global best practices to combat and decisively win over any such future crisis, will be critical. But, this is easier said than done – going by the past.

All concerned can feel it today, without any shade of doubt. There is no room for complacency in this regard, for anyone, regardless of having the best of health care infrastructure, diagnosing facilities, state of the art treatments of all types, including vaccines, for a wide range of number of life-threatening conditions.

As the W.H.O said, ‘The microbes didn’t go away. They just went out of sight. Instead, the focus turned to chronic, noncommunicable diseases, which came to receive much more attention. But nature was by no means in retreat. In fact, it seemed to return and took many health institutions and decision makers by surprise.’

It’s, therefore, high time for all to read the writing on the wall. A time to accept and realize that, when it comes to an unpredictable, crippling power of bringing the entire world to virtually a grinding halt – making even the most powerful nations feel helpless and highly vulnerable – what a new lethal microbe can do in one go, even the most developed and the powerful nation can’t. An all-time preparedness against biological threats, therefore, has emerged as a new normal.

By: Tapan J. Ray  

Disclaimer: The views/opinions expressed in this article are entirely my own, written in my individual and personal capacity. I do not represent any other person or organization for this opinion.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.