SCM: Embracing Technology For Patients’ Safety

Supply Chain Management (SCM) in the pharma industry is generally perceived as a logistic function, just in most other industries, involving the distribution of medicines from manufacturing plants, right up to pharma distributors. Thereafter, it becomes the responsibility of the respective distributors to reach these to the wholesalers, who cater to the needs and demand of retail chemists.

In tandem, pharma SCM is also playing a key role in reducing overall cost of drugs, improving the profit margin, and to some extent their affordability to a larger number of patients. This process involves efficient procurement of right products of the right quality, transporting them in the right condition, delivering them at the right location in right time, with optimal inventory carrying cost.

That said, today’s reality demands the SCM to cover much larger space. This calls for taking in its fold even those critical parameters that go beyond the realm of business performance – protecting the health and safety interests of patients, effectively. In that sense, SCM plays a pivotal role pharma business operation, having a potential to make a profound impact in the lives of many, quietly.

Coming out of the cocoon of narrowly defined distribution or logistic functions, pharma SCM, in many countries, has started rediscovering itself, as a multi-dimensional and multi-factorial business necessity, keeping patients within its core focus area, always.

I wrote on ‘The importance of Supply Chain Integrity’ and ‘Maximizing value of a new product launch with an innovative Supply Chain Management System’ in this blog on November 29, 2010 and August 30, 2010, respectively. Thus, in this article, I shall dwell on the role of pharma SCM in ensuring patients’ health and safety, embracing modern technology.

Current concerns:

Gradual transformation of SCM with high-tech interventions is visible now, but in a sporadic way. Speedy development initiatives in this area need to be more inclusive, everywhere. This is a paramount requirement of the pharma business, that has been prompted by serious breaches in the SCM process, affecting patients’ health, safety and security, besides impacting the brand image.

Manifestations of these get reflected in the instances like, availability of substandard and counterfeit drugs, or large product recalls, or quality issues with APIs and excipients escaping SCM scrutiny.

W.H.O says, it’s now all-pervasive:

The availability of substandard and falsified medical products, although is a menace to the society, seems to be all pervasive. The November 2017, Fact Sheet of the World Health Organization (W.H.O) recognizes this fact. The paper categorically states that no country has remained untouched by this issue – from North America and Europe to sub-Saharan Africa, South East Asia, and Latin America. Thus, this hazard, once considered a problem limited to developing and low-income countries, is no longer so.

The leading factors: ‘poor governance and weak technical capacity’:

The W.H.O study titled “Public health and socioeconomic impact of substandard and falsified medical products” released in November 2017 invited rather embarrassing media headlines, such as “India among countries where 10% of drugs are substandard.” Some of the most common medicines consumed in India, such as Combiflam and D-Cold were also found as sub-standard by Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) – as this news item reports.

Commenting on the possible reasons for this menace, W.H.O underscored that such substandard and falsified medical products are most likely to reach patients in 3 important situations. These are, constrained access to high quality and safe medical products, poor governance, and weak technical capacity.

The most important and viable option to effectively address this drug-safety threats is innovative applications of state of the art technology platforms. Many pharma players, are gradually realizing it through experience. Quite in unison, various Governments, India included, are also contemplating to follow the same path. Some nations are enacting robust laws for strict compliance of the remedial measures, as charted out by the respective drug authorities.

Harnessing technology as an enabler:

I reckon, harnessing modern technology will facilitate putting in place a robust ‘Track and Trace’ in the SCM, through product ‘serialization’, to effectively address this menace. As many would know, pharma serialization broadly means that each medicinal product pack will carry a Unique Identifier (UID), that can be tracked and traced till the same reaches the end-user.

The process may start with the key ‘touch points’ of a drug before it reaches the patients, such as suppliers, formulators, carrying and forwarding agents (C&FA) or distributors, wholesalers and retailers. This can be extended backwards, as well, to make the drug-sourcing process safer, which is also of crucial importance.

Leveraging technology for patient safety:

Realizing the importance of drug-safety needs of patients, many drug regulators, even in the developed markets, are leveraging technology as a key enabler in the SCM value chain to effectively address this issue. There are several recent global examples of achieving this specific objective. One such example comes from the top pharma market in the world – the United States.

Where the ‘Track and Trace System’ came as a law:

To ensure greater drug-safety for patients in the country, the oldest democracy of the world decided to introduce the ‘Track and Trace System’ in the SCM process by enacting a robust law. Accordingly, in December 2016, the US-FDA released the final guidance on the implementation of the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA).

Under this law an electronic ‘Track and Trace System’, through product ‘serialization’, will be put in place in the United States. As reported in the ‘Pharmacy Times’, DSCSA comes into force to regulate transactions between dispensers, pharmacies, and also among manufacturers, repackagers, wholesale distributors, third-party logistics providers, and trading partners, from November 24, 2017.

Following DSCSA, on June 30, 2017, the agency issued a draft guidance for the industry, titled Product Identifier Requirements Under the Drug Supply Chain Security Act – Compliance Policy. It informed the manufacturers and other supply chain stakeholders that “although manufacturers are to begin including a ‘product identifier’ on prescription drug packages and cases on November 27, 2017, the FDA is delaying enforcement of those requirements until November 2018 to provide manufacturers additional time and avoid supply disruptions.”

The US-FDA explains ‘product identifier’, as follows:

  • A unique identity for individual prescription drug packages and cases, which will allow trading partners to easily trace drug packages as they move through the supply chain.
  • Includes the product’s lot number, expiration date, a national drug code (or NDC), and a serial number. The serial number is different for each package or case. This creates a unique identifier – human and machine readable – to enable product tracing throughout the supply chain and enable all trading partners to better detect illegitimate products within the supply chain.

The US drug regulator clarified that the compliance policy outlined in the draft guidance applies solely to products without a product identifier that are introduced into commerce by a manufacturer between November 27, 2017 and November 26, 2018.

Several other countries also realizing its criticality:

Besides the United States, several other countries are harnessing high technology to make the SCM system more robust to ensure patient safety. Some of these include, EU, South Korea, Brazil and China, South Korea and Argentina. India too has initiated action in this area, but only for exports, as on date. Intriguingly, drug-safety for patients within the country doesn’t seem to be on the ‘must do’ list of the law and policy makers of the country, just yet.

‘Track and Trace’ system in India:

As stated above, the ‘Track and Trace’ system in India for drugs is currently applicable only to pharma exports. By a notification dated January 05, 2016, the Directorate General of Foreign Trade (DGFT) made encoding and printing of unique numbers and bar codes as per GSI Global Standard mandatory. This would cover tertiary, secondary and primary packaging for all pharmaceuticals manufactured in India and exported out of the country to facilitate tracking and tracing.

However, for drugs in the domestic market, although a draft proposal was circulated to the stakeholders in June 2015, but no significant progress has yet been made on its implementation in India.

Conclusion:

Availability of potentially harmful substandard and counterfeit drugs is posing a threat to public health and safety, almost in all countries across the world, with a varying degree, though. The November 2017, Fact Sheet of the World Health Organization (W.H.O) also highlighted this issue with a great concern.

A robust SCM systems, built on modern technological platforms are now receiving encouragement from the Governments in many countries, to contain this menace. Accordingly, lawmakers are formulating tough laws, and the drug regulators are specifying the requirements that need to be built into the pharma SCM mechanism.

Some pharma players, on their own, are further raising this bar, while framing their internal compliance norms for SCM. They realize that besides responding to patients’ health and safety needs, it is necessary for the commercial consideration too, alongside the company’s reputation.

Although, India is included among those countries where 10 percent of drugs are substandard, as the W.H.O reports, no such regulatory mechanism has been made mandatory within the Supply Chain to cover drugs in the domestic market, as yet. Interestingly, the DGFT has made the ‘Track and Trace’ mechanism only for the exporters, probably for patients’ health safety of the importing countries! Neither has the majority of domestic pharma manufacturers voluntarily implemented it, demonstrating ‘Patient-Centricity’.

Making SCM robust, weaving into it the drug-safety needs of patients, is a necessity in India too. When a large number of countries, including BRICS nations, are embracing modern technology to achieve this goal, why isn’t India doing so – intriguing…No…?

By: Tapan J. Ray  

Disclaimer: The views/opinions expressed in this article are entirely my own, written in my individual and personal capacity. I do not represent any other person or organization for this opinion.

 

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