Draft Pharma Policy 2017 Ticks The Right Boxes: A Challenge Still Remains

Pharma policy is not a panacea to address all related issues, neither for the patients nor the industry, in general. As I see it, it’s no more than a critical cog in the wheel of the overall macro and the micro health care environment in India. Regardless of this fact, and notwithstanding virtually inept handling of previous pharma policies in many critical areas, each time a new policy surfaces, it generates enough heat for discussion.

Interestingly, that happens even without taking stock in detail of the success or failure of the previous one. A similar raging debate maintaining the same old tradition, has begun yet again with the Draft Pharma Policy 2017. This debate predominantly revolves around the direct or indirect interests of the industry, and its host of other associates of various hues and scale.

Having said that, the broad outline of the 18-page draft policy 2017 appears bolder than previous ones in several areas, and has ticked mostly the right boxes, deserving immediate attention of the Government. One such aspect I discussed in my previous article, titled “Draft Pharma Policy 2017 And Branded Generics,” published in this blog on August 28, 2017.

There are obviously some loose knots in this draft policy, a few are contentious too, such as the changing role of National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority (NPPA), which apparently is doing a reasonably good job. I also find its link with several important national initiatives, especially ‘Make in India’, ‘Digital India’ and ‘Skill development’. Above all, the draft policy reflects an unambiguous intent to stop several widely-alleged business malpractices – deeply ingrained in various common, but important industry processes and practices that include, pharma sales and marketing, serious quality concern with many loan licensing manufacturers, and even in the issues related to ‘Product to Product (P2P) manufacturing.

The Department of Pharmaceuticals (DoP) reportedly commenced the preliminary rounds of discussion on August 30, 2017, where the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Environment and the Department of Commerce also participated in the deliberation. In this article, I shall not go into the speculative areas of what ought to or ought not to come finally, instead focus on the key challenges in making the pharma policy meaningful, especially for the patients, besides the industry.

Policy implementation capability:

Whatever may be the net outcome of these discussions, and the final contours of the National Pharma Policy 2017, the implementation capability of the DoP calls for a thorough overhaul, being the primary challenge in its effective implementation. Since 2008, several illustrious bureaucrats have been at the helm of this important department, but nothing substantial seems to have changed in the comprehensive implementation of pharma policies, just yet. Concerned stakeholders continue to wait for a robust patented drug pricing policy, or for that matter even making the Uniform Code of Pharmaceutical Marketing Practices (UCPMP) mandatory, which, going by what the DoP officials had reportedly hinted at many times, should have been in place by now.

The core reason for the same could well be due to a structural flaw in the constitution of DoP under the Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers, instead of making it a part of the Ministry of Health. The reason being to create a greater synergy in the implementation of both the Pharma and Health Policies, in a more meaningful way. But, that could be a topic of a separate discussion, altogether.

Initial adverse impact on the pharma industry:

Some of the following proposals, as articulated in the draft pharma policy 2017, are likely to cause initial adverse impact on the performance of the industry, especially considering the way the industry, in general, has been operating over a long time:

  • No brand names for single molecule drugs
  • Mandatory UCPMP with heavy penal provisions
  • e-prescriptions facilitating greater usage of less expensive high quality drugs with only generic names
  • Mandatory BE/BA studies for all generic drug approvals
  • GMP and GLP requirements in all manufacturing facilities
  • Restrictions on loan-licensing and P2P manufacturing.

Initial retarding impact, out of the above measures, may be felt on pharma revenue and profit growth, increase in overall manufacturing cost, and more importantly on the long term strategic game plans of most pharma players, in one way or the other.

The Government is aware of it:

Nevertheless, to make a significant course correction through policy interventions, in curbing widely reported alleged marketing and other malpractices, dubious quality standards of many drugs, and sufferings of many patients with high out of pocket drug expenditure, the Government apparently firmly believes that such an outcome is unavoidable, although need to be minimized. The following paragraph detailed in the Annual Report 2016-17 of the Department of Pharmaceuticals, vindicates the point:

“The domestic Pharma market witnessed a slowdown in the ongoing financial year owing to the Government’s efforts to make medicines affordable. The impact of this can be seen in the industry’s financials as well. The drugs & pharmaceuticals industry reported poor sales performance for two consecutive quarters ended September 2016. Sales grew by a mere 2.9 per cent in the September 2016 quarter, after a sluggish 2.5 per cent growth registered in the June 2016 quarter. The industry’s operating expenses rose by 5.4 per cent during the September 2016 quarter, much faster than the growth in sales. As a result, the industry’s operating profit declined by 5.4 per cent. Operating margin contracted by 185 basis points to 21.1 per cent. A 3.4 per cent decline in the industry’s post-operating expenses restricted the decline in its net profit to 0.8 percent. The industry’s net profit margin contracted by 160 basis points to 13.7 per cent during the quarter.”

Just the pharma policy won’t increase access to health care or drugs:  

Just a pharma policy, irrespective of its robustness, is unlikely to increase access to health care or even medicines, significantly, despite one of the key objectives of the draft pharma policy 2017 being: “Making essential drugs accessible at affordable prices to the common masses.” This articulation is nothing new, either. It has been there in all pharma policies, since the last four decades, but has not been able to give the desired relief to patients, till date.

Pharma and Health Policies need to work in tandem:

To be successful in this direction, both the Pharma and the Health Policies should be made to work in unison – for a synergistic outcome. This is like an individual musician creating his or her own soothing music, following the exact notations as scripted by the conductor of a grand symphony orchestra. The orchestrated music, thus created is something that is much more than what a solo musical player will be able to create.

This is exactly what is not happening in the health care ecosystem of India, over decades, and continues even today. Each of the Pharma and Health policies are implemented, if at all, separately, apparently in isolation to each other, while the holistic picture of health care remains scary, still progressing at a snail’s speed in the country!

The predicament of the same gets well reflected in a World Bank article that states:

“In India, where most people have dug deep into their pockets to pay doctors, pharmacies and diagnostic centers (or ‘out-of-pocket spending’) as the norm for a long time, vulnerability to impoverishment caused by medical expenses remains high. Though government health spending is estimated to have steadily risen to 30% of the country’s total health expenditure – up from about 20% in 2005 – and out-of-pocket payments have fallen to about 58%, dropping from 69% a decade ago, these levels are still high and not commensurate with India’s level of socioeconomic development. In fact, the average for public spending on health in other lower middle-income countries is more than 38%, while in China, government spending accounts for 56% of total health expenditure.”

Affordable drug – just one parameter to improve its access :

While ‘making essential drugs accessible at affordable prices to the common masses’ is one of the top objectives of the draft pharma policy. The degree of its success is intimately linked with what the National Health Policy 2017 wants to achieve. It promises ‘improved access and affordability, of quality secondary and tertiary care services through a combination of public hospitals and well measured strategic purchasing of services in health care deficit areas, from private care providers, especially the not-for profit providers.’

The Health Policy 2017 also states: ‘Achieving a significant reduction in out of pocket expenditure due to health care costs and achieving reduction in proportion of households experiencing catastrophic health expenditures and consequent impoverishment.’ It is no-brainer to make out that reducing out of expenses on drugs is just one element of reducing overall out of pocket expenditure on overall health care. When there is no, or very poor access to health care for many people in India, improving access to affordable drugs may mean little to them.

A major reason of the ongoing ‘Gorakhpur Hospital’ tragedy, is not related to access to affordable drugs, but access to affordable and a functioning public health care system nearby. In the absence of any adjacent and functioning Government health facilities, the villagers had to commute even 150 to 200 kilometers, carrying their sick children in critical conditions to Gorakhpur. The question of access to affordable drugs could have arisen, at least, for them, if the country would not have lost those innocent children due to gross negligence of all those who are responsible for such frequent tragedies.

Thus, improving access to affordable essential drugs, as enunciated in the pharma policy, depends largely on improving access to affordable and quality public health care services. Both are intertwined, and require to be implemented in unison. Without the availability of affordable health care services, the question of affordable essential drugs would possibly be akin to putting the cart before the horse.

Conclusion:

The degree of resistance, presumably from the industry and its associates, to have a new and robust National Pharma Policy that meets the related needs and aspirations of the nation, in an inclusive manner, is generally much more than any National Health Policy, for obvious reasons.

As several proposed changes in the draft pharma policy 2017 appear radical in nature, its grand finale, I reckon, will be more interesting. At the same time, navigating through the waves of tough resistance, coming both from within and outside, will possibly not be a piece of cake, either, for the policy makers achieve the stated goals. Nevertheless, in that process, one will get to watch where the final decision makers give-in or dilute the proposals, and where they hold the ground, supported by a solid rationale for each.

Thus, the bottom line is: Where exactly does the challenge lie? In my view, both the National Health Policy 2017, and the Draft Pharma Policy 2017 mostly tick all the right boxes, especially in ‘making essential drugs accessible at affordable prices to the common masses’.

However, the fundamental challenge that still lies ahead, is to effectively translate this noble intent into reality. It would call for making both these policies work in tandem, creating a synergy in pursuit of meeting the nation’s health and socioeconomic needs on access to affordable health care for all, including medicines.

By: Tapan J. Ray 

Disclaimer: The views/opinions expressed in this article are entirely my own, written in my individual and personal capacity. I do not represent any other person or organization for this opinion.

 

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